Other services

Jan 13th, 2016
  For the past few months, we have been working hard with website designers at Oxford, United Kingdom, to successfully come up with an even better, faster and user friendly website.   During this year of efficient service, we have listened to your valuable feedback and comments, we thought it was finally time to revamp/replace the old version with slicker user friendly site. This new version gives users a fantastic new platform to build on and as always to continue to grow and develop our service. We know how busy people are in these modern times, but please have a look around... + continue reading
Jan 06th, 2016
1. Irrelevant lists of previous jobs “Some industries do typically have longer CVs – for example, medical doctors should list all their job roles from their training upwards. IT CVs also tend to be quite long if the person has been involved in a number of different projects, but these are exceptions to the rule. Whether or not you should list your previous roles really depends on whether they are relevant to your future career. If the skills you’ve acquired will prove useful in the future, then you should probably include them, even if it was a long time ago. Usually, you won’t need to go... + continue reading
Dec 23rd, 2015
People think it’s hard to write a resume, for most people the process of writing a resume is like a trip to the dentist, but it doesn’t have to be. You don’t need to write that much to write, you have only one page to deal with. First of all, a resume is a sales tool, not a job application. Facts are important, but the way you tell is even more important. If you want a job, you are going to have to get over that. You must learn to present yourself with confidence. Before you start writing, do some research on current market needs, your long term career strategy, and the skills you have to... + continue reading
Dec 16th, 2015
The expression “it’s not what you say, it’s what you do” is never more true than during job interviews. Your body language can have a significant impact on how you’re perceived, and so you have to be aware of it from the moment you step through the door. That’s right, you’re being judged even before you’ve uttered your first word. Here are some handy hints to ensure your body language makes a good impression.   Do: Make eye contact: This is the best way to show you’re actually paying attention and engaging with the situation. Of course this doesn’t mean stare blankly at your... + continue reading
Dec 11th, 2015
What’s the best piece of interview advice you’ve ever received?   When you have an interview coming up, it seems everyone you ask has their own sure-fire tips to impress.   ‘Do keep your feet still’. ‘Don’t tap your pen’. ‘Talk to the receptionist – she’s sure to feed it back’. But, the problem is, how can you tell if that’s what recruiters really want? Luckily for you, we’ve been trying to find out by asking more than 300 UK employers about their biggest interview turn-offs and what it takes to impress them.   Here’s what we found out:   Be prepared: The key to... + continue reading
Dec 11th, 2015
Ok, so you’re fully prepared for your interview. But what about the actual interview itself? One of the easiest ways to offset any last minute nerves is to know what to expect. Generally, interviews follow a set pattern. The interviewer will: Tell you about the company and the job Ask you questions which will assess your abilities, personality and motivation If you have any questions, you'll be encouraged to ask Inform you of the next stage of the process and when a final decision will be made. Of course, every interview will be slightly different. There are... + continue reading
Dec 11th, 2015
 Your Skills: What are your strengths and weaknesses? What can you do for us that other candidates can't? What would your colleagues and friends consider as your best qualities? Why should we hire you? What the interviewer really wants to know: can you do the job? Know your strengths, and mention ones that are relevant to the job you're being interviewed for. It's important to quote examples of when you used the skills; it's not enough to just say you have the skills. Typical strengths employers look for are: Communication - the ability to get on... + continue reading
Dec 11th, 2015
So you’ve got that degree in the bag, waved goodbye to student life and are ready to finally earn some proper money. If you haven’t managed to land yourself a graduate job just yet, you might want to consider doing a graduate internship. It could provide you with the crucial work experience that most employers require.   WHAT DOES A GRADUATE INTERNSHIP INVOLVE? Most graduate internships last a few months. They are an excellent way to build your confidence, make industry contacts and hopefully help you on the way to getting a job. A substantial number of graduates get jobs through... + continue reading
Intership
Dec 11th, 2015
Experience is becoming a crucial factor for employers when deciding who gets their foot in the door. It’s strongly advised that students and graduates take the opportunity to complete a period of work experience to ensure they have a competitive advantage over their peers; and that’s where an internship can make all the difference.   SO, WHAT ACTUALLY IS AN INTERNSHIP?   An internship is a period of work experience offered by an employer to give students and graduates exposure to the working environment, often within a specific industry, which relates to their field of study.... + continue reading
Oct 29th, 2015
What to do: dress smartly, look bright and attentive, and speak clearly and confidently. First impressions really do count - studies show that employers make a decision about whether to hire you within the first seven minutes on average find out where the venue is beforehand, how to get there and how long it takes get your outfit ready the night before find out what kind of interview it will be so you can prepare examine the person specification and your CV/application form, and think about what type of questions they will ask you... + continue reading
Jan 06th, 2016
1. Irrelevant lists of previous jobs “Some industries do typically have longer CVs – for example, medical doctors should list all their job roles from their training upwards. IT CVs also tend to be quite long if the person has been involved in a number of different projects, but these are exceptions to the rule. Whether or not you should list your previous roles really depends on whether they are relevant to your future career. If the skills you’ve acquired will prove useful in the future, then you should probably include them, even if it was a long time ago. Usually, you won’t need to go... + continue reading
Dec 23rd, 2015
People think it’s hard to write a resume, for most people the process of writing a resume is like a trip to the dentist, but it doesn’t have to be. You don’t need to write that much to write, you have only one page to deal with. First of all, a resume is a sales tool, not a job application. Facts are important, but the way you tell is even more important. If you want a job, you are going to have to get over that. You must learn to present yourself with confidence. Before you start writing, do some research on current market needs, your long term career strategy, and the skills you have to... + continue reading
May 14th, 2014
What is CV The term CV is short for the Latin phrase 'curriculum vitae' which simply means 'direction of life'. In today's working world, a CV is a personalised document used by job seekers to provide a concise insight and overview into who they are, their educational and employment history, skills, interests, achievments and contact details. Along with a cover letter, CVs are one of the first things seen of a candidate by a prospective employer as you are required to supply them when applying for a job. When a company advertises a vacancy, they will create a candidate specification that... + continue reading
May 02nd, 2014
A job application is usually accompanied by a cover letter, which provides a supplementary overview of why you are suitable for the role. A cover letter is a great way to introduce yourself and your CV when applying for a specific position. They are generally one page at most in length, divided into a header, introduction, body, and closing. They should follow some key points: Reference where you learnt about the role and organisation Explain why you are sending the application Convince the reader to look at your CV Reflect your attitudes, skills and passions... + continue reading
Dec 16th, 2015
The expression “it’s not what you say, it’s what you do” is never more true than during job interviews. Your body language can have a significant impact on how you’re perceived, and so you have to be aware of it from the moment you step through the door. That’s right, you’re being judged even before you’ve uttered your first word. Here are some handy hints to ensure your body language makes a good impression.   Do: Make eye contact: This is the best way to show you’re actually paying attention and engaging with the situation. Of course this doesn’t mean stare blankly at your... + continue reading
Dec 11th, 2015
What’s the best piece of interview advice you’ve ever received?   When you have an interview coming up, it seems everyone you ask has their own sure-fire tips to impress.   ‘Do keep your feet still’. ‘Don’t tap your pen’. ‘Talk to the receptionist – she’s sure to feed it back’. But, the problem is, how can you tell if that’s what recruiters really want? Luckily for you, we’ve been trying to find out by asking more than 300 UK employers about their biggest interview turn-offs and what it takes to impress them.   Here’s what we found out:   Be prepared: The key to... + continue reading
Dec 11th, 2015
Ok, so you’re fully prepared for your interview. But what about the actual interview itself? One of the easiest ways to offset any last minute nerves is to know what to expect. Generally, interviews follow a set pattern. The interviewer will: Tell you about the company and the job Ask you questions which will assess your abilities, personality and motivation If you have any questions, you'll be encouraged to ask Inform you of the next stage of the process and when a final decision will be made. Of course, every interview will be slightly different. There are... + continue reading
Dec 11th, 2015
 Your Skills: What are your strengths and weaknesses? What can you do for us that other candidates can't? What would your colleagues and friends consider as your best qualities? Why should we hire you? What the interviewer really wants to know: can you do the job? Know your strengths, and mention ones that are relevant to the job you're being interviewed for. It's important to quote examples of when you used the skills; it's not enough to just say you have the skills. Typical strengths employers look for are: Communication - the ability to get on... + continue reading
Oct 29th, 2015
What to do: dress smartly, look bright and attentive, and speak clearly and confidently. First impressions really do count - studies show that employers make a decision about whether to hire you within the first seven minutes on average find out where the venue is beforehand, how to get there and how long it takes get your outfit ready the night before find out what kind of interview it will be so you can prepare examine the person specification and your CV/application form, and think about what type of questions they will ask you... + continue reading